Teaching in Kuala Lumpur

Living and teaching in Kuala Lumpur (KL) is the experience of a lifetime. Whilst the city may seem impenetrable at times due to constant clutter, construction, noise and traffic, scratch beneath the surface and you’ll discover a plethora of fun things to fill your weekends and evenings.

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Teaching in Kuala Lumpur

Living and teaching in Kuala Lumpur (KL) is the experience of a lifetime. Whilst the city may seem impenetrable at times due to constant clutter, construction, noise and traffic, scratch beneath the surface and you’ll discover a plethora of fun things to fill your weekends and evenings.

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Sight-seeing

Top (literally) of the list has to be the Petronas Towers – once the tallest in the world, this 88-story building is perhaps the most iconic building in Malaysia. Its twin towers are awesome and a sight to behold. At the base of the building you can find KLCC Mall and park, which are famous shopping and recreation centers. KL Bird Park and Butterfly Park are handily close to each other and make up an afternoon well spent.

Chinatown is one of the most popular tourist spots in KL and is where backpackers tend to hang out in KL. Based in and around Petaling Street, it is immersed in oriental culture and history and you can find all the best Chinese dishes here 24 hours a day. At night there’s a lively market filled with stalls offering all kinds of knick knacks and impostor items at rock bottom prices. The Little India enclave along Jalan Tengku Kelana, Klang is the biggest Indian street in Malaysia and an afternoon or evening here is quite an experience with loud Bollywood music, Tamil chatter, street stalls, colourful saris, banana leaf stalls, and ornate jewellery shops.

The highland resort Fraser’s Hill, nestled among the mountains is popular for its nature activities and its cool climate and has picturesque cycling and walking trails. Batu Caves, a  Hindu temple, dedicated to Lord Murugan, is one of the best-known tourist attractions in Kuala Lumpur. Located about 10 kilometers north of the city, the shrine is known for its giant golden statue and the almost 300 steps to the top – be careful of the monkeys, though – they are not shy and tend to grab food items from guests!

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Shopping

KL is packed with shopping malls. Whatever your feelings on them, living in KL they are impossible to avoid. Malaysians take retail very seriously with a lot of the malls looking like futuristic, elaborate complexes with a variety of themes. You can shop, watch movies, go ice-skating, eat international cuisine and even sing karaoke in a Kuala Lumpur mall. If you are looking for something less hectic and with a more local flavour head to Bangsar Village I & II. These twin malls offer upmarket fashions, quirky gift shops and feature some beautiful clothing from fantastic local designers.
Food and Drink

Marini’s on 57 has one of the best views in Kuala Lumpur and deserves a separate mention. Wonderfully situated on the 57th floor of the “Third Tower” the bar and restaurant has awe inspiring views of The Petronas and is known for its delicious Italian cuisine. It’s a little on the pricey side by KL standards so maybe save it for a special occasion.
Jalan Alor, just north of Bukit Bintang, is KL’s biggest collection of roadside restaurants and a unique food destination in the heart of the city. During the day it’s relatively quiet, but when the sun goes down the street transforms into a continuous open-air restaurant where you can sample pretty much every South East Asian dish you can think of.

If you are teaching in KL and missing your food favourites from home or are looking for organic, upmarket brands, head to one of the three B.I.G’s (Ben’s The Grocer) located around the city. This supermarket is an expat’s dream. Along with getting your shopping done, you can eat samples galore, watch live cooking demonstrations, attend themed shopping nights and even attend cooking classes. Ben’s also contains a butchers, bakery, oyster bar, deli, greengrocer, chocolatier, florist, coffee roaster and organic section. Phew! Bring your credit card!

How To Apply.

If you’re still at home, getting your visa is probably your priority and the process takes a bit of time and effort (depending on which country you will be employed in of course).

We will advise you on every step and make it as stress free as possible. Suffice to say, once it’s done and you’re here you’ll wonder what you fretted about. It goes without saying that if you have any questions, please email us using our Contact us form on this site or directly through admin@teachersforasia.com

So what exactly is a teaching Visa? This is what you will need to legally teach over here in Asia. It is usually valid for 12 months (the length of a standard contract) from the date of entry into the country and of course, it’s renewable.

In order to be eligible for this visa, teachers must hold a minimum of a Bachelor’s Degree (either 3 or 4 years) from an accredited University and be a citizen of one of the following English speaking countries – USA, Canada, Ireland, UK, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa.

Your visa will only allow you to work at the specific school which sponsors your visa. You cannot work at another school unless you receive a special permission from immigration on your visa. When you receive your visa, it may be a single-entry visa. If you wish to travel internationally from your base country here in Asia, as many teachers do, you will need to apply for a multiple reentry visa at the immigration office. This is very easy to obtain and usually doesn’t cost a lot.

And of course we are available for an informal skype chat once you get in touch with your details via our Contact Us section or simply email us at admin@teachersforasia.com